Abandoned Sugar Refining Factory at El Tarajal, Malaga

Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

I first discovered the old, historic, abandoned Sugar Refining Factory of El Tarajal, Malaga, when I was sent to work at a nearby industrial park.

Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

I love photographing old, abandoned historic places of interest, such as the Old Provincial Prison of Malaga. So I couldn’t wait to get in a photo report about this new discovery.

Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga side

On the chosen day I set off with my oldest son. The factory is surrounded by a wall, but I hoped someone would come along and open it.

Interior Courtyard Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

Here is a photo with open doorways, but they’re not open to the exterior. They look out onto an inner courtyard that you have to climb into through a hole.

Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

Sure enough, we were lucky and as we arrived someone else arrived too. It was a group of farmers, they are using the factory now as a stable and dozens of horses live in it now.

Interior Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga with horses

At the beginning of the twentieth century Spain provided practically all the sugar that was consumed in Europe, so sugar production became a major industry in Spain at that time. Sugar factories were erected all over the country.

Water Tower Sugar Factory of El Tarajal Malaga

Interior Water Tower Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

This was the water tower, where water for the factory was stored.

Chimney Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

The Sugar Refining Factory of El Tarajal was built in 1931 (and if there was any doubt about that, the date is inscribed into the chimney along with the name “AMET”, which I assume is the company that probably built the factory).

Graffiti on the Sugar Factory El Tarajal Malaga

Graffiti on the side wall of the sugar refinery of El Tarajal, Malaga.

Interior Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

Once considered an architectural wonder with walls dressed in sumptuous tiles, displaying a rather formal, stately classical air, the factory was built by the influential Larios family, the family that gave their name to Malaga’s main street.

Back of Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

After the Second World War Europeans began to import sugar from Central and South America because it was cheaper, and no one wanted Spanish sugar anymore. So all the Spanish sugar refining factories were closed and left alone to their devices. To the ravages of time, abandonment and vandalism.

Latrines Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

We assumed that these were the latrines. They were sooo indescribably disgusting, we didn’t want to step inside to find out!

Interior Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

You can be sure this is not a place where you would want to touch anything! We made sure to touch as few things as possible. When climbing inside (through the holes as there were no open doors) we did have to touch the icky walls a bit.

Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

I went with my oldest son, which was great, because he was able to chat with the farmers while I took photos. Farmers are very laconic and don’t think about things a lot and don’t spend a lot of time wondering about things and pondering over things. (Or at least it seems that’s what they’d like us to believe).

Back Sugar Factory Tarajal Malaga

So they didn’t think very many things about the factory. They didn’t know much about it nor did they have any interest in its history. They told my son: “It’s just a big stable!”

I’m not too sure what sugar cane looks like, but it would only make sense that it would grow near a sugar factory, right?

Sugar Cane at El Tarajal Malaga

My son told me it had been a bit boring. So I took him for a Coca-Cola to reward him afterwards for being such a game haha!

Horses El Tarajal MalagaIf you enjoyed this post (I really hope you do!), maybe you will also like:

The Old Provincial Prison of Malaga

Malaga in Black and White

CBBH Photo Challenge: Reflection

A Treasure Huntin’ We Will Go

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5 comments on “Abandoned Sugar Refining Factory at El Tarajal, Malaga

  1. Sarah Jane says:

    Hi, I hope you don’t mind me commenting. I found this blog by searching for ‘abandoned places malaga’. My family and I will be coming to Malaga in May for a holiday and although it will be mainly for my young children I am really hoping to get at least one day where me and my husband can get about and see some abandoned and derelict buildings and places. I am obsessed with them! This is exactly the kind of thing I am looking for. As someone with local knowledge, are there any other locations you could recommend?
    Many thanks in advance 🙂

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    • Hi Sarah Jane. Thanks so much for dropping by! Yes there are, of course, a few places you can visit. What an unusual hobby, visiting abandoned places. Well you can read about a few here on this blog. Another place that has been abandoned for years is the Old Provincial Prison, although you can’t go in, but recently the city has started to take interest and one day I noticed them bringing in materials to restore it, so I don’t know how much longer it will be “abandoned” haha. Of course if you just walk around the historic city centre you will see abandoned buildings. I might put up more posts about other abandoned places if I discover them, so check back every once in a while (or subscribe! 🙂 ). I hope you have a great trip!

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  2. […] So this photo was taken on a recent “adventure” that we undertook, and that you can read about here: Abandoned Sugar Refining Factory at El Tarajal, Malaga. […]

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